More From Niagara Falls

Rogue giving me a kiss at the top of the falls. I'm standing with my body toward the falls, but I'm looking to my right. Rogue has her paws up on the rock portion of the railing, giving me a kiss. I'm wearing a black tank top, blue denim jeans, black sandals, a lime green treat pouch and light pink baseball cap with a horse embroidered on the side in white. Rogue is wearing her dark purple Har-Vest with a black guide handle attached and on the side is Guide Dog embroidered in yellow.

Rogue did an awesome job at guiding me in Niagara Falls. She followed her line perfectly well, not veering onto the grass at all and keeping us away from other people walking along the sidewalks. It was a really good opportunity for me to see how far Rogue has progressed in her learning. She had a bit of trouble staying in a straight line when crossing the road, but I was able to easily redirect her with the help of Huib, who was walking behind us. the only issue we ran into, was when Rogue forgot to stop at an up-curb. Thankfully, Huib was watching and grabbed my shoulder before I could trip.

Niagara Falls

this weekend we were in Niagara Falls for my sister’s wedding..

Rogue and I standing in front of a metal railing that overlooks the falls. You can see a rainbow in the background. I'm wearing a black tank top, blue denim jeans, black sandals, a light pink baseball cap with a horse embroidered in white and a lime green treat pouch. Rogue is wearing her dark purple Har-Vest that has Guide Dog embroidered on the side in yellow, along with her purple martingale that has Haida pattern whales in black and Cessna's black braided leather leash.

I wanted to post some more pictures from our weekend, but there seems to be an issue with the picture uploader, so I’ll have to try again later.

A Night At The Races

Rogue and I. I'm standing to her right and she's looking toward the camera. I'm wearing denim jeans, black sandals, a dark purple tank top and light pink with white baseball cap. Rogue is wearing her purple Har-Vest, but you can only see the front chest strap. Behind us, you can see the score board and the railing that blocks us from the horse race track.

Rogue and I. I'm squatting down to her right and she's looking toward the camera. I'm wearing denim jeans, black sandals, a dark purple tank top and light pink with white baseball cap. Rogue is wearing her purple Har-Vest, but you can only see the front chest strap. Behind us, you can see the railing that blocks us from the horse race track.

This was rogue’s first time at the horse races. she was interested in the smells, but was very focused on me throughout the night. She kept targeting my leg with her nose (our form of eye contact), so went through her treat bag within just over an hour, lol!

We also started working on pairing “leave it” with “look” (nose targeting my leg), so that she’ll someday automatically nose target my leg when I ask her to leave something alone. She did really well at this pairing, so I’ll probably have to raise my criteria sooner than I expected. her absolute favourite behaviour to do is nose target, so I guess I shouldn’t have been so surprised.

At the end, we took her into the casino for a bit and she just settled at my feet while I played the slots.

Woofstock

Sunday morning, we picked up our friend kelly and her Special Skills Dog Guide, dayton. We drove to Oakville to drop off Canyon, and then headed to Toronto.

This year was Woofstock’s 10th anniversary, so we were eager to attend.

The vendors were all set up along Front Street and the rescues were located in a park on Church Street.

For the most part, I thought this year wasn’t as good as past years. there were still lots of vendors, rescues and people in attendance, but there didn’t seem to be many people giving things away and the rescues were set up in a way that was completely inaccessible to anyone who could not walk along the grass.

our friend, Kelly, had brought her manual wheelchair, so this meant the rescues were out.

Rogue and Cessna were really well behaved. I had put one of the Easy Walk Harnesses on Cessna, and Huib had Rogue wear her halti for the first little bit. the Easy Walk kept Cessna from pulling, and the Halti helped rogue settle down. Cessna wore the harness the whole time, but rogue didn’t need the Halti after 20 minutes of walking around

Since there are a lot of dogs and people who cannot control their dogs, we carried Cessna and Rogue’s working gear in our backpacks, instead of having them wear it.

We didn’t buy too much this year. Since Rogue tends to get gas and loose stools from kibble and most commercial dog treats, we stayed away from most vendors. We tried a few new treats with the girls, but only two made the cut, the rest were ignored or dropped on the ground when we offered it.

The two things we did buy, were dehydrated lamb liver from Nothing Added and lamb, apple, cinnamon treats from Wellness. We also got a couple of free plastic frisbees and tennis balls for Canyon, but were unable to find anything else too exciting.

I think I’m going to try and email the Woofstock organizers to see if they can return the event to being more accessible.

After we had spent a few hours walking around, we got back into the car and drove to Oakville. We had dinner with our friend Della and her daughter Kelsey, and then returned home, completely exhausted.

Even though the event itself wasn’t as good as usual, I felt as though the trip was well worth it. We had a chance to see how well Rogue and Cessna did with the distractions and other dogs, and we got to see how mature Rogue has become. I’m not sure why, but she really seems to have grown up a lot over the past couple of weeks…

Annual Check-Ups

Last Friday, Canyon, Cessna and Rogue went to see Dr B for their annual checkups.

Just before going into the clinic, we let them all go to the washroom, hoping for a feacal sample. We didn’t end up with a sample, but Cessna found her own feacal sample to try out. She rolled in goose poop, and smelled horrible! Huib tried really hard to get the smell out of her coat, but wasn’t overly successful so, stinky Cessna came with the other two into the clinic.

Rogue was the first to be checked out. Dr B listened to her heart, lungs and abdomen. while listening to her heart, she commented on how relaxed rogue was – she said her heart was beating nice and slow. After the physical examination, rogue had blood taken for her Heartworm and Lyme tests, and for her distemper and Parvo titters. We have the dogs on a limited vaccine protocol, so they have titters done every other year to make sure they still have the right level of immunity. the only vaccine we don’t run titters for, is the rabies one, because it is really expensive. After the blood was drawn, Dr b asked if there was anything that concerned us, we mentioned rogue’s possible soft trachea issues, and her need for some sort of carbohydrate (oats, rice, quinoa, sweet potato) in order to be less gassy. She said it’s possible she has an extra flap of skin in her trachea, that is swelling in the summer, but she said to continue what we’re doing, if it’s working. As for the need for carbohydrates, she said that works and that we can also add them into the diets of the others.

Next to be examined was Canyon. He had all of the same blood tests done, but was also due for his rabies vaccine. After checking him over, Dr b looked at the spots where he had scratched and licked his fur away, sometimes causing wounds. She called them hot spots, which I don’t agree, but told us to clean them thoroughly and then put this stuff on them called Allederm. She also asked if we had any concerns, and we told her about the couple of times he’s woken up with left hind leg pain. We said it looked as though he most likely had a leg cramp, since it went away within a few minutes, and had only happened a few times, a few months apart. She couldn’t find any signs of a problem, but told us that she recommends people start their large breed dogs on Glucosamine at 5 years of age, but that we could always start him now if we wanted. She also examined the tiny cyst on the lower lid of his left eye and we discussed neutering. Other than a higher chance for prostate and testicular cancer, there isn’t really a big push for neutering, so we agreed that we’d rather leave things as they are, but said we’d watch the cyst to make sure it doesn’t grow.

Finally, it was stinky Cessna’s turn. She had been hiding under my chair while the others were checked over. Dr B did a physical examination and took blood for her heartworm and Lyme tests, as well as, for titters and for a geriatrics work up. Cessna will be 10 in October, so we wanted to check all of her blood values, to make sure she’s as healthy as possible. After that was done, we had Dr b re-check her fatty lumps and asked her about the choking and coughing Cessna has started to do more often. i told her Phoenix used to also do it, and that I felt it might be related to the fact that both were trained (by their school) using choke chains. She said that older dogs tend to need to clear their throats more, but she checked her throat, mouth and lungs and heard nothing worrisome. the only issue Dr b found with Cessna, was a slightly broken back molar. It happens to be the same back molar Phoenix broke at the age of 10, so I’m guessing git has to do with age. I told her I’d make an appointment sometime this summer with the doggie dentist who did Phoenix’s tooth extraction, and since Cessna isn’t bothered by the tooth, she said that was fine.

When she was done checking over the dogs, Dr b asked us what they were eating and what supplements we are giving them. She was happy with everything, and said that our plan to return to giving them Kelp is a good idea. Retrievers have a high rate of cancer, so anything we can do to help prevent this is a good plan.

We haven’t received any calls regarding their blood work, so I assume everything is perfect, or at least in the normal range.

Now that our wallet is a lot lighter, it’s time to save for their next vet visit, lol!

Oh The Places We Will Go

sometimes you just need a glimpse to realize you’re on the right track.

As everyone knows, Rogue and I have been on a journey filled with ups and downs, left turns, right turns and U-turns. raising and training your own guide dog is not easy.

But, this week has given me the slightest glimpse of the possibilities.

Over the past year, I have been working hard to find gear that rogue will tolerate.

I’ve found martingales that open like regular collars, so she doesn’t have to put her head through the opening. she no longer ducks my efforts to put her collar on.

I’ve found working vests/backpacks that don’t require her to do more than stand still while I put it on. She’s getting better. to help her along, I’ve begun getting Cessna dressed in her harness, and then getting Rogue dressed. I then walk around the house getting myself dressed, and giving Cessna treats for being so awesome. rogue is taking less and less time to break free of the “roots” holding her in place when the vest goes on. the only thing I have to remember, is to get her to come to me before I reach for the vest – sneaky, I know 🙂

Our next challenge has been the guide handle. Huib made one for us to use and Rogue hates it. I’ve gotten some material to make her a soft guide handle, but I am also getting Rogue dressed shortly before we leave the house, so that she can work on breaking free of the “roots”. The past two days have been really good, but we’ve still got a long way to go in this area.

Yesterday we went to the mall to do a bit of work. I had Rogue walk from one end of Stone Road Mall to the other. She tried to go into a couple of stores, Huib said she must be a girl because they were all shoe stores, lol!

When she began veering into the stores, I had her stop and then we fixed our direction and continued to walk.

On our way back to where we had started, rogue did amazing! She only tried to go into one store, but I was able to tell her no and she fixed her own direction. She walked me around an older person using a walker and around a couple of teenagers. I was worried she’d brush me against the person with the walker, but Huib warned me we were approaching and said Rogue left a good amount of room between us.

We need to work on staying a little straighter, but I felt really good with Rogue’s progress.

Later, I did some curb and sidewalk work with Rogue. Huib followed behind, giving me an idea of when we were getting close to the curbs and when Rogue was beginning to veer. She has a bit of an issue with keeping too close to the left side of the sidewalk, and with wanting to check out things as we walk, but those are simple problems to fix.

When we came to the curb, she blew it twice before she figured out exactly what I wanted. Each time she stepped off the curb, I dropped the guide handle and dramatically said “Whoops! too bad, let’s try that again”. When we came to the next down curb, she only blew it the first time, and nailed it dead on the next two tries. the final curb was the same, she blew it the first time, but nailed it the second. I will do more work with her in this area, but I don’t foresee it taking her too long to figure out that all down curbs must be stopped at.

In order to give her a bit of variety and some work on just sidewalks, we walked for about 45 minutes. At one point, we came upon a truck that was parked completely across the sidewalk. Huib explained it all to me and then we set off, wanting to see what rogue would do. she walked me up to the truck, I felt out with my right hand, then said “Rogue, forward”. She immediately turned toward the road, stopped at the down curb, walked me along the back of the truck, and then walked me back up onto the sidewalk. We had a PARTY!!! I tripped on the up curb, but I didn’t care, she had just done a major obstacle perfectly!

I had a bit of trouble with her pull and sometimes with her pace, but I think a longer guide handle is needed, in addition to some working out on my part.

Whenever you get comfortable with a guide dog, you don’t always realize their pace slowing down, so wen you go to work with another dog, you end up with shin splints. when I got Cessna, I had the most painful shin splints, but after a couple of months, they went away and it was amazing to fly like the wind with her.

Cessna hasn’t really slowed down, but with three years of not really working, the shin splints are back with a vengeance!

The work rogue and I did today really showed me that we’ve progressed and that with some more time and patience, we might just actually make it as a team.

Rogue sits on top of a bale of hay. She's wearing her Silverfoot collar and leash that are a mixture of different blues.

Barn Hunt

Saturday, Huib, rogue and I went to a Barn Hunt workshop. Rogue’s breeder had mentioned the workshop on her Facebook page and asked if anyone wanted to join. Three families, including us, came out. In total, there were eight dogs from Red Labrador Retrievers present.

Karen and Chris (Rogue’s breeders) brought three females, including Rogue’s dam, cheyenne. It was so cool to see Rogue and Cheyenne together. they are quite similar in size, Cheyenne is just a bit heavier and has a little different face. their personalities are also quite similar, cheyenne was very excited to be around the other dogs, and barked at random times – just like her daughter. Huib tried to get a good picture of the two together, but neither one wanted to cooperate, lol!

Side views of Rogue with her dam, Cheyenne. To the left is Rogue and to the right and behind is Cheyenne.

Our day started with a short introduction to Barn Hunt, including a discussion of the rules and regulations. We were then split into groups of 5, and sent through the various stations.

at station one, the dogs were shown an aquarium with a couple of rats inside. We were told to tell our dogs to “find the rats” or whatever words we wanted to use. We were asked to encourage our dogs and show them where the rats were located.

Athena, a one year old female from Red Labrador Retrievers sees the rat in the aquarium. she's very interested in them.

Similar to her dam, rogue was interested in the aquarium, but more into the smells, than the actual rats.

Chris, Rogue's breeder, and Cheyenne, Rogue's dam, checking out a rat. Cheyenne isn't overly interested, so the woman has taken a rat out of the aquarium to get her attention.

At the next station, the dogs were introduced to a plastic tube containing a rat.

Chris, Rogue's breeder, with Sedona, a 6 month old puppy from Red Labrador Retrievers. Chris is pointing to the tube holding the rat, while Sedona looks at him curiously.

We were again instructed to tell our dogs to “find the rat”, and encourage them to get excited about the tube.

rogue was pretty excited about the tube, she nosed the tube and rolled it around.

at station three, the dogs were shown two tubes, one containing a rat and the other containing soiled litter from a rat’s cage.

rogue checked both tubes out very thoroughly, but seemed a bit more interested in the one containing the rat.

Rogue finding the tube containing the rat, and leaving the other one alone.

at station four, two tubes were hidden beside a bale of hay, one containing the rat and the other containing soiled litter. We were instructed to encourage our dogs to search and to let the “judge” know which we felt our dog was saying the rat was in.

rogue checked out both tubes thoroughly and seemed to indicate one over the other, but maybe Huib read her wrong, because he said it was the tube containing soiled litter. the “judge” then picked up the one containing the rat and had us show it to her, so she could check it out more.

Rogue is sniffing a tube containing a rat with her paw on top of the tube.

the final station gave us a chance to work on our own with having our dogs go through a tunnel made of hay and a tube containing a rat. we were instructed to have our dogs run through the tunnel and “find the rat”.

Rogue had a lot of fun running through the tunnel to the rat.

After lunch, we each had an opportunity to do the Barn Hunt instinct test.

each dog was asked to find the tube containing the rat in under a minute.

Chris and Sedona at the mock instinct test. Chris is about to release Sedona, so she can search for the tube containing the rat.

Of the eight dogs from Red Labrador Retrievers, only three passed the instinct test. Athena did the test in 32 seconds, Cheyenne did it in 59, and rogue did it in just 25!

The woman who ran the Barn Hunt workshop said she would be setting up a Barn Hunt trial in the summer, so I think we’ll watch for the date and see how rogue does.

Two Weeks In guelph

I had meant to write an update on Wednesday, but time got away from me. We’ve now been in our new home for two and a half weeks.

The past week and a half have been busy. We’ve unpacked more boxes and moved some furniture around. We’ve taken the labs on training trips. We’ve gotten together with Kelly and her pack twice. And we’ve taken all three dogs for hikes and a swim.

Last Sunday, we drove to Aurora to plant some flowers at my Mom’s grave. Mother’s Day has always been a tough day for me since Mom’s passing, but this year seemed easier. dad came with us, and I think seeing how happy he was helping Huib plant the flowers at Mom’s grave, really helped. After we were done, we drove to Sutton to see if my Aunt Dawn was around. her house was unlocked, so Huib called her cell phone and found out she was visiting her friend nearby. We drove over there and had a great time visiting. Aunt Dawn’s friend has several foster children, as well as, two male golden retrievers, two love birds and a 9 month old male pot belly pig. she told us to bring the dogs in with us, so we brought them in slowly. Canyon was initially interested in the pig, but quickly lost interest and settled at my feet, but Ruben, one of the goldens (Jack was away with her daughter tree planting) was a little too interested in him. Ruben kept licking Canyon’s face and ears, so just before we left, Huib took him and Rogue back to the car, so he could have a rest. The labs had to stay on leash because they were really interested in the birds and wouldn’t stop trying to sniff Poomba it was a good experience for Rogue though, she had never met a pig, let alone one that lives in a house.

Rogue and I have started doing some sidewalk guiding. She’s still hating the guide handle, but once she has it on for a while, she stops moping. I’ve been getting Cessna dressed and then her dressed, then walking around the house with Cessna, talking to her and giving her treats for being such a good girl, in an effort to make rogue jealous. It actually seems to be working. Rogue is taking less and less time to break free of the “roots” holding her in place when she first gets her vest and guide handle on. We’ve done some forward walking on the sidewalk, and other than her pull being excessive and her wanting to stay close to the grass on her side, she’s doing well. she is keeping me well away from the sidewalk edge and is quite responsive to my cues. this week, I hope to start her curb work, but it all depends upon her mood and the weather.

On Wednesday, Kelly, her boyfriend Josh, and their two Australian Shepherds, Piper and Baron, came to visit. the four of us, along with rogue and the Aussies, went over to the park across the road to do some group obedience. Josh was having a bit of a rough day, so he worked on keeping Baron’s attention and keeping him under threshold, while Kelly and I worked on getting the girls (Rogue and Piper) to perform their various obedience cues. Rogue was a little distracted by the smells and scenery, but overall, I think she did pretty well. I had her wear her new teal Kong harness, since I felt it was a good opportunity to work on her “pet” manners.

I bought Rogue the Kong harness so that she can wear it on leisure walks. I don’t want her to pull on her collar, and the Easy Walk harness seems to have caused some unforeseen issues. the Kong harness has a ring on the back that the leash attaches to and padding on the chest area, so Rogue finds it a bit too comfortable to pull. I’m going to work on her Level 1 behaviours, and start teaching her loose leash walking with it. I wanted to get her another front attach harness, but the only one I can find is the Easy Walk and I think the way it fit and the way it worked, may have caused Rogue discomfort and long-lasting issues with it. We’ve worked hard on getting her to feel okay with putting pressure into the chest strap of her Har-Vest, so I don’t want to go back to the beginning there.

On Thursday, Huib and I took the three dogs over to the park across the road to play frisbee. Canyon really likes frisbee, so we thought he’d enjoy running for it on the soccer field. He ran for it a few times, and then got distracted by another dog and ran over to check it out, ignoring our calls. Huib ran after him and noticed that it wasn’t actually the dog he was running to, it was a swampy pond he had seen. Canyon saw Huib coming, but totally ignored him and laid down in the muddy water – bad boy! Rogue had followed him, but did not get into the water – both youngsters were put back on leash and had to watch Cessna play frisbee on her own. Cessna thought it was awesome to be playing frisbee while the others were stuck on leash. After Cessna had had enough, we put her back on leash and then started walking along the gravel path that leads around the swampy pond (the water from the rain gutters collects there). I think that once Cessna and I do the route a few more times with Huib, we’ll be able to walk it on our own.

On Friday, we met up with a friend for lunch at Eastside Mario’s. I met Evelyn during my time at the University of Guelph. I had been a volunteer and then Co-ordinator for their Safe Walk Program, and Evelyn was a dispatcher for the University of Guelph Police. I’m not sure how we got talking, but when I used to live in Guelph, evelyn and I would get together for lunch once a month, so now that I’m back, we’re going to try doing that again.

When we had arrived at Eastside’s Huib went to park and the orlando stalled on him twice. we have had this happen a couple of times before, but they were never this frequent, so Huib became concerned. When we were done lunch, I asked evelyn if she’d mind following us over to the GM dealership, and of course, she said no problem. When we got back into the car, Huib saw that the engine light had come on, so we knew something was up. At the dealership, the woman at the counter told us they had no appointments, but Huib asked if they could at least run a diagnostics to see if it was safe for him to continue driving (since it was Friday), she said it might just take a bit. We took the labs into the waiting room and I did some obedience with Rogue – I try to do this in all places, so she learns to follow my cues everywhere. About 30 minutes later, we heard our names over the intercom and were told that the orlando was ready. They had replaced a valve.

While we had been waiting, I received a text from kelly asking if we wanted to meet her and Ace (her 4 year old male black lab) for a hike and swim. We met them at an old quarry near our former condo building. the dogs ran ahead, while we chatted. At the end of the long path, there’s a river that used to have a bridge over it, but the city must have taken the bridge down, so we let the dogs play there. A woman and her young male italian Mastiff were there as well, so we were a bit more cautious with allowing Canyon to roam. the other dog was intact, and seemed to be paying a little too much attention to Canyon, so Huib called Canyon over for some treats and waited until the woman and her dog were gone, before releasing him again. After about half an hour of swimming, we started walking back towards the vehicles. Kelly and Ace had to get back home to let the Aussies out, but we stayed behind and let our three swim in the quarry. Canyon was hilarious. He kept running along the shore to find the shortest route to the toy, while Cessna swam out to retrieve it. Once she made her way back to the shore, Canyon would meet her and bring the toy back to us as though he had been the one to do all the work. Just before we left, a woman and her female golden retriever showed up. the golden was really interested in our toy, so Huib threw it a few times for her to retrieve – the other woman hadn’t brought any toys for her.

this weekend we haven’t done too much. the weather is warm and starting to get a hint of humidity, so I play short games of fetch with Canyon in the backyard, but try to stay cool indoors otherwise. My migraines seem to be better living here. Maybe it’s because I am able to stay cooler, dad doesn’t have access to a wood stove, or maybe the weather is just more stable right now – either way, it’s nice not having to take extra meds.

If It Weren’t For The Internet

This entry is for the Assistance Dog Blog Carnival being hosted by Frida Writes.

Sometimes we need a friend. Someone to bounce ideas off. Someone to talk to when we’re unsure. someone to share our accomplishments with. someone to tell us we’re doing okay.

For me, this support has come from the internet.

If it weren’t for Twitter, blogging and Facebook, I’m not sure Cessna and I would have succeeded, or I would have gotten as far as I have in preparing Rogue for her future job of guide dog.

It is through Twitter and bloging, that I met others who have gone through similar experiences with their guide dogs, and others who have raised and trained their own service dogs. It is through Facebook and instant messaging, that I have been able to keep in close contact with old and new friends to talk about the ups and downs of work with Cessna, and training with Rogue.

When I received Cessna, almost eight years ago, i had no clue what I had gotten myself into. Cessna was not my first guide dog, or even my first guide from her school, she was my third, but she was the youngest and the most difficult. Cessna was an 18 month old, squirrel chaser, who had emotional scars from training and who knew the guide commands, but I’m convince, had no clue what to do with them. we struggled for over a year and a half, trying to understand one another, and getting nowhere fast. But, I had friends who listened to my worries, who listened to my thoughts, and who provided words of encouragement at the right moments in time. some friends were just a city away, but others were a couple provinces away, so Facebook, email and instant messaging were a big reason why Cessna and I succeeded.

A huge turning point for Cessna and I came when I decided to google service dog programs in my area. I had just finished my social work degree, and wanted to see if there was a small service dog program that would appreciate my social work skills on a volunteer basis. this is how I learned about K-9 Helpers, and began learning about clicker training. Cessna and I had been together for about two years, but it wasn’t until I started taking classes with Dogs In The Park, that we truly began to understand one another and Cessna’s emotional scars from training began to really heal. the primary trainer at Dogs In The Park was in charge of training the psychiatric service dogs for K-9 Helpers, so when I began volunteering, she offered to work with us.

the internet played such a vital role in helping Cessna and I become the dream team, and it has not failed me with rogue either. when I began thinking about raising and training Cessna’s successor, I was met with many questions and concerns from family members. through blogging about my issues, and tweeting about my thoughts, I met people who had and who were going through similar experiences. I met people with all sorts of disabilities that had overcome the odds and were successfully working with canine partners, they had raised and trained themselves. Over the past two years, rogue and I have encountered many obstacles, but our internet friends and blogging family have helped us defy expectations.

through the internet, I have met amazing people and made forever friends.

They listen to my thoughts. They listen to my worries. they share in my excitement. They feel for my losses. and they provide words of encouragement and wisdom at just the right moment.

If it weren’t for the internet. If it weren’t for our virtual friends and family. I’m pretty certain, Cessna and I wouldn’t have become a dream team, and Rogue would not be on the path to becoming my future partner in crime.

It’s Hurricane rogue’s Birthday!!!

guess what???

today is my birthday!!!

Today I am TWO!!!

I can’t believe it…I’ve been alive for twenty-four whole months now!!!

can you??

Let me tell you all about what I can now do…

I can guide Mommy through hallways;

I can guide Mommy around obstacles to my left;

I can stop at curbs;

I can find doors;

I can walk nicely at Mommy’s side (when there isn’t too much going on around us);

I can leave treats alone that Mommy drops on the floor;

I can stay in a sit or down for 10 whole seconds, while Mommy stands 4 feet away;

I can give her my attention (our version of eye contact) by touching my nose to the side of her left leg;

And, I can close cupboard doors and drawers.

I’ve learned so much in the two years I’ve been alive, so I think it’s time for a party, don’t you???

Rogue running through snow. She's wearing a lime green and black columbia winter coat.