Progress and Struggles

On Thursday evening we had another obedience class.

Class started with me working in the ring alone. Susie is trying to help me become more confident with the exercises. She is hoping that by practicing each week, it will become less stressful and require very little thought to complete. I do different heeling patterns, walking forward, stopping and turning in various directions. Susie thinks I am looking less uncomfortable each week.

Some dogs, like Rogue, cue off their human’s body language, so if the human knows what they are doing, it’ll be easier to avoid cuing the dog to do the wrong behaviours.

When I was finished, I called Arizona into the ring and we got to work.

Heeling is still an issue, but we have progressed in other areas. Ari did several sit-stays ranging from 15 to 30 seconds long. She stayed in place until I recalled her, and then she stayed until I returned and released her. I also used ‘touch’ to keep her attention off Susie and Huib as they made “beep, beep…” sounds, so I knew where the posts were for the figure eight.

We will get there.

Rogue and Huib were awesome!! Huib has really worked on keeping Rogue’s attention on him, and it has made a huge difference!! He needs to continue working on having Rogue stay until he returns – she gets up as soon as he comes close – but it’ll come. She just needs to learn that when we cue a ‘stay,’ she’s supposed to remain in position, but if we’re just walking around the house, she needs to MOVE.

To add a bit of challenge to our work, Susie suggested we both come into the ring. She had us go to opposite ends of the room and asked us to follow her instructions. Both girls were distracted by the other team. Rogue was distracted by me and Ari, while Arizona was distracted by Huib and Rogue.

We also did a ‘group’ sit-stay. Both girls rocked it!!

Susie says we will do this each week to give the girls some high distraction work. No one is more distracting than your best buddy and your other human.

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Saturday morning was Cessna’s annual vet check. I was worried about the large lump under Cessna’s front left leg. It has grown since last year’s appointment, so I thought Bianca might say we needed to have it removed. We were pleasantly surprised to find out she was not really worried, but said we would continue watching it. I am glad because she’s almost 13.5, so I don’t know if it would be good to do surgery, and I don’t think I could decide against it. Cessna is really happy, pretty healthy, and appears to have a lot of life left in her.

Bianca asked a lot of questions about what we are feeding Cessna and what supplements she is getting. She also asked about any illness or concerns. Cessna has lost a whole kilogram since last year, so Bianca wants us to feed her more and to bring in a urine sample. She didn’t have any concerns when she did the physical exam, but did voice her distress regarding Cessna’s coat condition. I told her it hasn’t changed in the past year or so, even though we have tried a number of different options. We will not be vaccinating Cessna anymore, but Bianca still wanted to run Parvo and Distemper titres, along with a geriatric blood panel and a test for Heartworm and tick-borne diseases. The results from the tests should come back in about a week.

After paying, we took Cessna back to the vehicle, and then brought each of the others in to be weighed. All three youngsters need to lose about four pounds!!

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In the afternoon, we had tracking with Laura.

Canyon was all over the place for most of his track. He found both articles and did some pretty good work the last 10 metres or so. I think it is just going to take time.

Once he gets the idea, he’s going to be great!!

Arizona was amazing!! She found all of her articles, did some surface changes (crossing over sidewalks), and barely overshot corners. Unlike Rogue, Ari only seems to go a foot or two past her corners before she realizes she has lost scent.

She stopped a couple of times to think, but Laura said that’s normal, so not to worry and not to rush her.

Rogue started off really well, but I think having to relieve herself caused some focus issues. She rarely goes to the washroom when not at home, but we fed them after Cessna’s appointment, so I think her schedule was off.

Rogue missed her first two articles, but found the others. She cut corners in several spots, so I think that might have been why she ended up on the opposite side of the sidewalk from her track at one point.

Rogue has had a really good couple of months for tracking, so it was about time for some mistakes.

I’m thinking about entering her into an urban test at the end of April, so hopefully we’ve got our struggles done for a bit.

Until next time 🙂

Arizona The Dare Devil

I really need to start making notes on what Arizona does each week for these posts.

Hmmm…

Arizona is really beginning to grow. For a while I thought she wasn’t growing, but this week she seems to be slightly longer, a bit heavier and I’ve had to make her puppy collar bigger. I’m not sure how much she weighs, but when we got her she was 10.2lbs and I’m pretty sure she’s over 15 now.

I’ve continued to work on her name recognition, recall, sit and zen (or leave it). She’s doing well in all areas, so I think it’s definitely time to add something new, such as ‘down’ and maybe ‘stand’.

Arizona is already an escape artist, dare devil and incredibly smart at just shy of 12 weeks.

She’s earned the nicknames of Trouble, Little Devil and wild Child.

We have put a fence up and thought we closed off every single puppy escape route, but yesterday Arizona found the only spot we had missed. I didn’t realize she had left the yard until our neighbour came over to warm me. She said that Arizona had slipped through the fence, but had made it back in on her own. Huib reinforced the spot and hopefully it will keep our little escape artist out of trouble.

We are currently using Canyon’s grooming table as a cat dish holder. Arizona is highly food motivated, so decided to try jumping up onto the table. Huib watched her and she got her back feet onto the edge of the table, then as she tried to push herself up further, she fell backwards, lol!

Thankfully puppies are bouncy because it didn’t even seem to phase her. Once she got over the shock of falling, she was even more determined to figure out a way of getting up onto the table.

I’m continuing to work on her ‘leave it’ cue, so hopefully sooner than later I’ll get to a point where I can use it to stop the attempts at getting the cat food.

Last night when I was putting away some garbage I heard Arizona’s bell jingle from the direction of the dining table. I walked toward the sound and found her walking along the table trying to find any food we’d missed. I quickly picked her up off the table, put her onto the floor and pushed all of the chairs in, so hopefully she won’t do it again.

We’re using a canvas crate to block access to the upstairs for now. Huib is going to install a gate to block access to the cat litter box, but for now we’re using the crate since it’s light and works pretty well.

Logan, our calico, seems to enjoy taunting Arizona, so the other day she took off running and jumped over the crate to get upstairs. Arizona took off after her, pushed the crate out of the way and then ran up the stairs. Huib quickly went to the treat container and whistled. Arizona came racing back, flew down the stairs and landed on top of the canvas crate.

This little girl is one of the most curious and brave puppies we have ever had. if she keeps up with these demonstrations, we’re going to have a heart attack before she turns 6 months old.

what else have we done…

Huib and I took her for a short visit to his work. He is the Assistant Director of Care at one of the local long-term care homes, so when he had to go in for a quick check of something, I decided to bring Arizona. She was really curious about the smells in his office and greeted one of the nurses. We’ll probably bring her again during the day sometime, so she can meet some of the residents.

On Saturday my friend was making balloons at City Hall for John Galt Day. Since it was outdoors I thought it would be a good opportunity to bring both Rogue and Arizona out. I had Rogue work and Huib carried Arizona since she doesn’t have her vaccines yet. there were kids playing in the splash pad, tons of people checking out the various vendors and then my friend making balloon animals for a constant line of kids.

rogue was AMAZING. She was very focused on working and she wasn’t even phased by the shrieking and popping balloons. I got a lot of comments on how well behaved she is and when I told people I trained her myself, they were even more impressed. I don’t really like when people tell me I’m inspiring, but I do like it when I get compliments on rogue. With her being my first owner-trained dog, it’s always nice to hear compliments from the public.

Arizona hadn’t had her morning nap, so she was pretty sleepy by the time we arrived at the festivities. Huib parked the car in a lot 10 minutes away and had Arizona walk there and then back. She pretty much slept in his arms the entire time we were at City Hall and when she wasn’t, she was lying in the shade, lol!

Today is Arizona’s first full day of eating just raw. We had switched her to orijen puppy formula from the Pro Plan her breeder was feeding, but we thought it was time to begin feeding her raw like the others, so began the switch a week or so ago. for the next couple of weeks we will probably only feed her ground or chunks of meat with ground up egg shells for calcium. then we’ll start adding in softer bones, like turkey or chicken neck bones or wings before we try her on the tougher pork, lamb and beef bones.

tonight we’ll be registering her for the oakville and District Kennel Club’s conformation dog show September 12th to the 14th. She’ll be in the baby puppy class, so won’t earn any points toward her championship, but it will be a good time to start getting her used to the environment. She’ll show again in October as a baby puppy at the Purina National in London and then in November the real serious stuff begins 🙂

This week has been a lot better than previous weeks. Arizona seems to be settling in more and we’re learning her schedule. She doesn’t like to sleep past 7:30am, but must have a nap from 9:20am until 12:30pm or she’s a very cranky puppy. she’s started sleeping four to five hours straight every night and she’s beginning to show signs of possibly knowing where she needs to relieve. Now we just need to work on the curiosity because it’s going to get her into trouble soon.

10 Weeks Old

The past week has been full of ups and downs. Maybe it’s primarily due to the fact that I have had migraines almost every moment of the week, so my patience is a bit thin, but it’s definitely been a trying one.

Arizona with her head sticking out the front screen door.

Arizona is learning tons and settling in amazingly well with our gang, but she’s also becoming more determined and opinionated.

rogue continues to play with her and has even started explaining the rules and boundaries – I am SO proud of the Rogue Monster!

Cessna doesn’t know what to do with the puppy and has decided to just keep ignoring her existence.

Canyon tolerates her efforts to play and has even started doing his tug game he used to play with Rogue. He lies on the ground holding a toy in his mouth and Arizona tugs on the toy with all her might. Rogue and Canyon still play this game, so as Rogue became bigger she started pulling him around the house.

Arizona sleeps well some nights, but sleeps horribly the following night, it’s SO frustrating!! I am hoping this pattern will stop sooner than later because the getting up every hour is quite exhausting.

She is sleeping in her crate without the blood-curdling screams though and even takes naps for a couple hours each morning in it, so that’s progress.

On Friday our friend Karen came with her 7 month old puppy, Spark, and our friend kelly came with her two dogs, Piper and Ace. It was a really good experience for Arizona to have the three dogs to interact with.

A view from above of Arizona sleeping under a chair while on a coffee date with a friend.

Spark played with her the most and got a bit rough at times, so Karen would grab his collar and have him relax for a minute before being allowed to return.

Piper took a bit to get used to Arizona’s size. I think a lot of dogs wonder if it’s safe or appropriate to be playing with such a small puppy. After she realized that Arizona wasn’t breakable, they had a blast wrestling and chasing one another. Ace wanted nothing to do with the puppy, but that isn’t too abnormal for the big guy, he is more into wandering the yard or mourning Rogue.

On Saturday, Kelly took Arizona for a few hours. She had a coffee date with a friend, so took Arizona to sit on the patio.

On the learning front, Arizona is doing amazingly well at learning to come when we whistle, so now we need to decide if it is worthwhile teaching her the word ‘come’ or if whistling is good enough for recall. Her work with zen (or ‘leave it’) is coming along. I am starting to say ‘leave it’ as she goes to back off from the treat I have in my palm. Arizona is also doing really well at learning to sit. Our little friend, Kira, has been helping me out with this. I really want to teach Arizona to sit using the capturing method, so I have had Kira clicking whenever she sees Arizona sit. Arizona began to quickly figure out what she was getting the clicks and treats for, so now Kira is starting to say the word ‘sit’ as Arizona’s bum is moving to the floor. I think she’ll be ready to learn a hand signal for sit by the end of the week.

I am going to continue working on zen, sit and come, but I also think I may start trying to capture the ‘down’ and try teaching Arizona to give paw or maybe even paw target. I am eager to teach her to nose target, but my friend Robin has suggested I avoid teaching the nose target until Arizona is understanding ‘leave it’ because she is extremely food motivated and needs to learn a bit of self-control.

Arizona has started to switch over to eating raw. We switched her over to Orijen puppy just over a week ago from Pro Plan, but now it’s time to switch her to eating raw like the others. So far she is just getting a tiny ground beef ball with her breakfast, but probably by the weekend she’ll be eating almost purely raw. Maybe the diet change will also help with the house training.

The house training is a challenge, but I think it’s improving. Arizona is now 10 weeks, so her ability to wait should be increasing. We have reintroduced the box with wood stove pellets, like her breeder used, so I am hoping this will speed up the house training process. The only real issue I am having, that is perplexing, is that Arizona has now decided pooping in her exercise pen is acceptable, but seems to know that she shouldn’t be relieving in her crate.

Puppy rearing can be such an adventure, stay tuned for more updates on Taygold’s Kindred Spirit, who should have really been named Trouble not Arizona.

Case of the Screaming Rabbit

My labs are SO bad!!

Last night, around midnight, I let the dogs out for their final relief. I asked everyone to sit, stuck my head out the sliding door to make sure there were no skunks, and then released everyone to go outside.

Rogue barked once. I told her to be quiet. she barked once more. I told her that was enough.

And then the screaming started.

It wasn’t the dogs. It wasn’t a person. It was like a high pitched screeching.

I immediately opened the sliding door and said “LEAVE IT!”

Huib ran over to the door and went toward the girls. As he left, he told me Canyon was hiding behind me – he’s too cute!

He said that once he was close, he saw a rabbit quickly hop away.

I guess Rogue had seen the rabbit and ran over. When she barked, she must have scared it so it froze in place. that gave Cessna enough time to join rogue and together they pinned the poor thing, probably scaring it, so it screamed. thankfully the rabbit didn’t injure the labs and they didn’t seem to injure it. when Huib got the girls back inside, he checked them over for injuries and then took a flashlight outside to see if he saw any blood. all he found was some fur, so hopefully the rabbit lived and didn’t end up having a heart attack somewhere.

Rogue is from a hunting line and I’m pretty sure Cessna is as well, so I can’t really blame the girls for their reaction, but I definitely feel bad for the rabbit. If Huib hadn’t run over, I’m not sure it would have survived, and I guess the girls would have had breakfast.

Dental Surgery

One week and four days ago, Cessna had dental surgery.

Back in June, I took her to see a doggie dentist for a free check and he found several teeth that needed to be extracted.

When we arrived at the doggie dentist office, he gave Cessna a sedative. We sat with her in the waiting room so it could take effect. Cessna was then taken into the back to have an IV inserted and to have x-rays done before we left.

In June, we’d learned that Cessna had a broken premolar, a chipped upper incisor and two loose lower incisors that all needed to be extracted. After the x-rays were done, we learned that Cessna has a condition where her body is reabsorbing the roots of her teeth. This meant that some of her other teeth would need to be removed because they were just sitting in her mouth.

In total, Cessna had two lower molars, an upper premolar, an upper incisor and four lower incisors extracted.

The condition that Cessna has can progress or stay the same, so each year Cessna will need to go for x-rays and possibly have more teeth removed.

After we learned the results of the x-ray we were told we could leave for an hour, so we went home to grab some breakfast.

When we returned to pick Cessna up, she was beginning to wake up from the anesthetic, so we waited. When she could stand they had us take her outside so she could walk a bit on the pavement. We then took her home and gave her a Tramadol before bringing her into our bedroom for some rest. She was in some pain before the Tramdol kicked in, so she was whimpering. Huib grabbed a pillow and blanket and fell asleep on the floor with Cessna curled up against him.

After about three days, Cessna began to feel better and over the past week she has been trying to play tug and fetch again.

We take her to see the doggie dentist on Wednesday to see whether she can start eating her regular meals or if she needs to continue eating boneless meats.

Annual Check-Ups

Last Friday, Canyon, Cessna and Rogue went to see Dr B for their annual checkups.

Just before going into the clinic, we let them all go to the washroom, hoping for a feacal sample. We didn’t end up with a sample, but Cessna found her own feacal sample to try out. She rolled in goose poop, and smelled horrible! Huib tried really hard to get the smell out of her coat, but wasn’t overly successful so, stinky Cessna came with the other two into the clinic.

Rogue was the first to be checked out. Dr B listened to her heart, lungs and abdomen. while listening to her heart, she commented on how relaxed rogue was – she said her heart was beating nice and slow. After the physical examination, rogue had blood taken for her Heartworm and Lyme tests, and for her distemper and Parvo titters. We have the dogs on a limited vaccine protocol, so they have titters done every other year to make sure they still have the right level of immunity. the only vaccine we don’t run titters for, is the rabies one, because it is really expensive. After the blood was drawn, Dr b asked if there was anything that concerned us, we mentioned rogue’s possible soft trachea issues, and her need for some sort of carbohydrate (oats, rice, quinoa, sweet potato) in order to be less gassy. She said it’s possible she has an extra flap of skin in her trachea, that is swelling in the summer, but she said to continue what we’re doing, if it’s working. As for the need for carbohydrates, she said that works and that we can also add them into the diets of the others.

Next to be examined was Canyon. He had all of the same blood tests done, but was also due for his rabies vaccine. After checking him over, Dr b looked at the spots where he had scratched and licked his fur away, sometimes causing wounds. She called them hot spots, which I don’t agree, but told us to clean them thoroughly and then put this stuff on them called Allederm. She also asked if we had any concerns, and we told her about the couple of times he’s woken up with left hind leg pain. We said it looked as though he most likely had a leg cramp, since it went away within a few minutes, and had only happened a few times, a few months apart. She couldn’t find any signs of a problem, but told us that she recommends people start their large breed dogs on Glucosamine at 5 years of age, but that we could always start him now if we wanted. She also examined the tiny cyst on the lower lid of his left eye and we discussed neutering. Other than a higher chance for prostate and testicular cancer, there isn’t really a big push for neutering, so we agreed that we’d rather leave things as they are, but said we’d watch the cyst to make sure it doesn’t grow.

Finally, it was stinky Cessna’s turn. She had been hiding under my chair while the others were checked over. Dr B did a physical examination and took blood for her heartworm and Lyme tests, as well as, for titters and for a geriatrics work up. Cessna will be 10 in October, so we wanted to check all of her blood values, to make sure she’s as healthy as possible. After that was done, we had Dr b re-check her fatty lumps and asked her about the choking and coughing Cessna has started to do more often. i told her Phoenix used to also do it, and that I felt it might be related to the fact that both were trained (by their school) using choke chains. She said that older dogs tend to need to clear their throats more, but she checked her throat, mouth and lungs and heard nothing worrisome. the only issue Dr b found with Cessna, was a slightly broken back molar. It happens to be the same back molar Phoenix broke at the age of 10, so I’m guessing git has to do with age. I told her I’d make an appointment sometime this summer with the doggie dentist who did Phoenix’s tooth extraction, and since Cessna isn’t bothered by the tooth, she said that was fine.

When she was done checking over the dogs, Dr b asked us what they were eating and what supplements we are giving them. She was happy with everything, and said that our plan to return to giving them Kelp is a good idea. Retrievers have a high rate of cancer, so anything we can do to help prevent this is a good plan.

We haven’t received any calls regarding their blood work, so I assume everything is perfect, or at least in the normal range.

Now that our wallet is a lot lighter, it’s time to save for their next vet visit, lol!

Aspen Update

It’s now been about a month and a half since Aspen’s surgery, and two months since we first noticed the large, firm lump that ended up being an inflamed lymph node.

It has taken a while, but the lymph nodes are pretty close to normal feeling now. This is a relief, because Dr B was getting a little worried about the inflammation being a sign of something much worse than just an infected, broken canine tooth.

Aspen also started a glandular made by Standard Process for her Hypothyroidism about a month and a half ago, and it seems to be doing something. Aspen has always been an anxious dog, but over the past few weeks we’ve noticed a more relaxed girl. She didn’t really show any of the classic signs of Hypothyroidism, but we’ve also noticed her gastrointestinal issues have decreased. In a couple of weeks, we will be going on another road trip, so we’ll have a really good idea from that, regarding whether or not Aspen has become less anxious.

about four or five years ago, Aspen began developing a whitish spot on her left eye. Over the years, the spot has grown, but Dr B hasn’t been able to figure out what it could be other than a scar. At Aspen’s spring visit, Dr B again commented on the spot, which is now like a white crescent shape, and suggested we get in contact with a doggie opthomologist. We haven’t had a chance or the money to do so, but had planned to take her in the new year.

Thursday night Huib was bored at work, so decided to try researching Aspen’s eye problem. After a bit of Googling different combinations of search terms, he had found the answer to the mystery.

Aspen has Lipid Keratopathy, or fats in the eye that appear as a white crescent shape. The condition is common in dogs with Hypothyroidism and is a sign that there is too much cholesterol in the bloodstream. there is no pain associated with the condition, and we aren’t sure if it is reversible, but it is recommended that dogs with the condition are put on a low fat diet with Omega 3 fatty acids (or fish oil) and extra fibre.

We had begun to notice Aspen’s right eye getting a similar look back in the spring, but it has since cleared up, so we’re wondering if the raw diet, which for Aspen consists of a lot of fish because of her gastrointestinal issues and requires an Omega 3 supplement, was part of the solution.

Huib has printed off the 2010 article he found in a veterinary journal for Dr B to see, and we are going to make sure Aspen no longer gets meats with skin and when possible a little more fish and daily fibre.

It’s been a good week for good news on Aspen. It’s scary to know that she has been dealing with the Hypothyroidism and Lipid Keratopathy for close to five years, but now that we are aware and know of how to improve things, I hope we’ll be able to spend many more years with our golden girl.

raw, Homemade Or Commercial…

Ever since Phoenix was diagnosed with Idiopathic Vestibular Disease on December 3rd, we’ve been trying to make a decision on what to feed him. Dr B does not want him eating kibble because he doesn’t chew his food and worries he will aspirate, but she also wonders if changing to more of a natural diet might also help clear up his ears and get rid of some of the other annoying issues he has from both old age and his pesky life-long allergies.

You’d think this would be an easy decision, but there are several factors which need to be considered – cost, preparation time, safety and our other dogs, just to name a few.

Cost is something I always think about when deciding to change something with my dogs, because I do not work and Huib has been wonderful about supporting me, but I don’t want to push his loyalty too far. We’ve been looking at the possibility of buying a bigger chest freezer and ordering large quantities of meat from local farmers, but so far have run into the problem of where to find reasonably priced beef, pork and lamb – we will continue to get our chicken from the Maple Lodge Factory and whole chickens from the farm down the road. When you live in northeastern Ontario like we do, there is a limited supply of farmers who raise and sell their own livestock. As for finding the veggies at a reasonable price we’ve decided that it will be easiest to get stuff when we’re in Waterloo at Costco and the St. Jacob’s Farmers Market or check out the discount section in the grocery store for a little more variety. Then in the summer we will be able to grow some of our own veggies and catch some pike and bass in the lake behind our house.

Right now we feed Phoenix a mixture of a cup and a half of moistened kibble (Fromm’s white fish & sweet potato) and a can of wet food (either Merrick’s Before Grain or Performatin Ultra) each day so it works out to be about 3-5 dollars a day. In order to feed Phoenix a homemade diet he will need to have a mixture of muscle meat, organ meat, veggies, and a small amount of dairy and grains, in addition to supplements which include a high level of calcium carbonate. This supplement can be highly expensive, even though farmers use it as a part of their fertilizers, so this is one factor that has made our decision to move from commercial food more difficult. In a raw diet, half of the diet should be raw meaty bones (ie. Chicken necks, pork feet or beef tails) which eliminates the need to supplement with calcium carbonate because the bones are ground up with the meat, as opposed to removing them, like in the homemade diet. Taking just cost into consideration we’re thinking that homemade diets are out, but still aren’t sure if a raw diet is right – even though it would also mean we would eat more healthy, since it would be silly only to feed the wonderful veggies and meat to Phoenix.

Next we’ve been looking at preparation time. When feeding Phoenix his current diet of commercial food it takes about 30-45 minutes to prepare because we have to turn on the kettle to boil the water needed to moisten the kibble, then we have to wait for the mush to cool before adding the wet food and necessary supplements (for old age & allergy prevention). If we were to change to a raw diet we would need to think much further ahead and it would take a bit more time to prepare, but if we made more than one meal at a time would it be easier in the end? I think the barrier to feeding raw here would be, what will we do in the case of our visits to Waterloo every six weeks…?

After looking at the above factors – cost & preparation time – we’ve begun looking at the safety of a raw diet. There are many people who would say there are absolutely no risks involved with feeding a raw diet, but with Huib being a nurse and me not having the greatest vision this is something we need to think long and hard about. The University of Guelph’s Ontario Veterinary College hosts a blog where various pet related issues are discussed and they have posted a very informative pdf file on the raw meat controversy, which can be found on their resources page. The main concerns they outline are the possible transmission of infection and disease (for example salmonella), a potential dietary nutritional imbalance and the issue of swallowing foreign bodies (such as bones). Even though proponents of the raw diet would consider these as being a non-issue, Huib and I need to really look at safety as a possible deal breaker in making this change with Phoenix – he needs to worry about his patients and I need to think about my safety as well as the safety of the other animals.

One way in which we could avoid the risks of swallowing foreign objects would be to ground the bones along with the meat so there would be no possibility of choking or injury to Phoenix’s throat or intestines through splintering. Since eating slowly is not something Phoenix knows how to do, I think making his food into a smoother consistency would be a good idea. As for the risk involved in the transmission of disease, I think it’s reasonable to think that this would be something we’d need to look at in not just his food, but our own as well. I guess all we can do here is to make sure we only buy our meats from a respectable supplier and take care in the storage and preparation process. No matter how careful someone is though, there is always the possibility of something going wrong, so as long as we’re always conscious of safety, I don’t see feeding Phoenix a raw diet as being out of the question.

Finally, there is the consideration of our other dogs. Cessna and Canyon have always been picky eaters and as a result we’ve had to try and think of creative ways of keeping them interested in their kibble. We’ve tried adding canned food or juices and fats from cooking once in a while, in addition to changing their kibble all together on a semi-regular basis. This has worked well in the past, but we’re wondering if by feeding Phoenix differently, we might run into some problems with getting them to continue with their commercial diets. We have thought about changing everyone over to the same sort of raw diet, but Aspen is doing well with her current food and we worry that by changing her we might irritate her sensitive bowel. Then there’s Cessna, our always willing “hunger striker” – would she even consider eating something (raw meat) we ourselves wouldn’t even think of? I wonder this because my aunt’s friend is a hunter and one day while preparing a venison stew for us decided to give Cessna an uncooked piece, she immediately dropped it on the floor and looked up at him in disgust – she ate a piece later though that I offered her from my leftovers before throwing them out. I’m sure Canyon would be totally willing to change over to this way of life, but I’m not so sure about my little Cessnaroo.

I guess it would be easiest and make most sense to just focus on getting a diet ready for Phoenix before worrying about who else might benefit or be willing to change. But, if we’re wanting to use Canyon as a stud it might be something to consider in the future…

I know this post ended up being a long-winded ramble, but I hope it helps others out there who might be considering whether a change to a homemade or raw diet could be better than the commercial food their dogs are currently eating.