Archives for October 2015

Happy 12th Birthday!!

Happy 12th Birthday Cessna!!

I say it every year, but I really do mean it, time sure flies. Even though Cessna has been with me for 10 and a half years, I feel like we just became partners. Maybe it’s because once we gelled at 18 months together, we really never became separate.

Cessna has been a wonderful partner and friend. She may not be as bonded to me as Phoenix or Rogue was/is, but she was still an amazing worker and is a great friend.

We have sure had some interesting adventures together, but I still think we have more to look forward to, so cheers to another few years together my spunky little squirrel chaser!

Ask Anna

Ask Anna: Advice for the Furry and Forlorn by Dean Koontz

This book is really short and really silly, but it is also adorable and Anna is a golden retriever, so of course I had to read it.

I really cannot say much about this book without giving anything away.

If you’re looking for something cute and fluffy, this book is for you.

Canyon’s Seizures

As mentioned in earlier posts, Canyon has partial seizures.. He has been having them for about 4 years now, with them becoming more frequent over the past year or so.

Up until this past month, his seizures tended to happen about every 4-6 weeks, so we had decided to keep him off medication. Last January, we started giving Canyon 100mg of Coenzyme Q10, and we aren’t sure if it really does anything, but it also doesn’t hurt anything.

Over the summer, Canyon went 15 weeks without a seizure and we were optimistic.

In early September he had a mild seizure, followed by another mild one 11 days later, but we were still optimistic.

Then, 10 days later, on October 2nd, Canyon had his normal seizure, we still weren’t too worried.

This morning, at about 1:49am, Huib heard Canyon getting out of his crate and felt uneasy about it, so felt him. We immediately got down on the floor and began the waiting game. Canyon often knows when they are coming, so warns us and we usually have between 2-4 minutes to wait before the real thing happens. Once Canyon’s usual seizure took place, he seemed himself and went to get up, but had trouble – now we were worried. I helped him lay back down and over the next 45-50 minutes he went through moments of trembling, just having a rigid body, and acting himself. Never once during this period of time did he lose consciousness or control of his bowel or bladder. It all seemed to effect his motor skills. After about 35 minutes, Huib put a 1mg tablet of Ativan under his tongue and we waited for it to take effect. He appeared relaxed and ready to move after 10 minutes, so Huib offered him a treat and asked for a couple basic cues, he did them eagerly and then started toward the door, so Huib walked with him downstairs and to the backyard. As he took a step outside, he raised his paw over his head and became rigid again, so Huib picked him up, called everyone back inside and then carried him upstairs. He gave Canyon another 1mg tablet of Ativan and hugging him tightly, we waited for his body to relax again. It did around 2:50am. Huib helped Canyon back to his crate (he sleeps in there with his door open) and we climbed into bed. Canyon slept for a couple of hours and then woke me up to go outside. I followed him and after he peed, we returned to bed and he slept until our alarm, at which time he greeted us with a ball, ready to play fetch.

We think it is time to seriously consider medication. We have made an appointment for 4:00pm this evening with Bianca, their vet. I am hoping she can suggest a medication that won’t make him extremely drowsy and hungry all of the time, but in the end, we just want our golden boy better.

I will keep everyone posted on his progress.

A Note From Blog Management

Dear Loyal Blog Readers,
I am so sorry for the long periods without new entries. I have so many ideas for posts and lots of stuff to share, but I keep forgetting to write it down. I am not going to promise to write more often, but I will promise to always return and update you all.

Sincerely,

Brooke

The Blogging Human

Service Dog Committee

I’ve wanted to post this entry for almost two months, but I wanted to make sure I didn’t share anything I wasn’t permitted to share..

A couple of weeks ago we were sent the minutes for the meeting and once they are approved, they will be publicly available.

Now that I have an idea of what kinds of things I can share, here’s my post.

The Canadian General Standards Board, Committee on Service Dogs is comprised of: organization heads, government officials, some academics, a couple of professionals (like a veterinarian), and then a number of general stakeholders, such as owner-trainers, disability groups and other service dog handlers.

Other than Rogue, there were about 11 other dogs. It was neat because even though there were 12 dogs in one room, you really didn’t notice any of them unless you happened to walk past and their handler told you to watch a paw or a tail.

Rogue and I sat beside a guy and his dog both days and neither paid any attention to the other. I was SO proud of my little red girl!

The first meeting started out with a video introducing everyone to what CGSB does and then each of the committee members introduced themselves. I had struggled all night to figure out what I wanted to say about myself, so I was ready and I don’t think I sounded too nervous.

Once all of the introductory stuff was done, the committee chair asked if anyone had questions. There were some of the usual questions about how this committee came to be and then about how long it would take for the standards to be developed.

As I had guessed, it was Veterans Affairs who initiated the process and who are funding the venture. The VA wants a set of guidelines to follow when deciding whether a veteran should receive funding for their service dog.

And, also as I thought, the standards are voluntary, so it is up to each individual province to implement them. This means that it’s not the big fix many people were looking for. As an owner-trainer, this news made me happy because it means that at least for now I don’t need to worry about Rogue not being able to perform her duties in public.

The process is supposed to take about 2 years, with about 6 meetings during that time.

Once people asked all of their questions, the chair asked us to start tossing out ideas for the scope of the committee. Not everyone understood what was meant by scope, so after about 20 minutes of less than helpful ideas, the chair gave us a definition and explanation.

I don’t remember off hand what was decided, but I do remember that we had 4 basic points that people felt were necessary to cover within the standard.

A discussion surrounding what terms we wanted to use in the wording of the scope description kept coming up, so the chair moved us in that direction.

The rest of the afternoon was taken up by a debate surrounding terminology. The discussion primarily focused around whether we wanted to use ‘service dog’ or ‘assistance dog,’ and ‘handler’ or ‘client’ or ‘user.’

Terminology has been a big part of my thesis research, so I sat back and listened to everyone talk, making notes as I listened.

The split seems to be between the industry people and the handlers when it comes to what terms should be used.

The industry tends to follow the language of Assistance Dogs International who uses ‘assistance dog’ as an umbrella term which then breaks into guide dogs, hearing dogs and service dogs. The handlers all seem to want ‘service dog’ because it’s the term that appears in most government documents and the one that is used in public.

From my research, I have to agree with the handlers because ‘service dog’ is the term I’m seeing used within the literature, unless the article is written by someone from the UK. As the discussion was selling, I put my hand up and said exactly that.

Once we had sort of settled on using ‘service dog,’ we moved onto debating whether we should be using ‘handler,’ ‘user,’ or ‘client.’ Of course, handlers didn’t want to be called users or clients, but those are the terms used within the industry. After some back and forth, the chair reminded everyone that the standards were mostly meant for government, so we need to use terms that are found within government documents.

It was at this point when someone suggested we form a working group to determine what terminology should be used and the definitions that should go along with the various terms.

The second day started with a quick recap of the scope we had come up with the day before. We then started to talk about what conditions a dog could help with and what types of service dogs there are.

This part didn’t go too slowly, we appeared to come up with a lot of good points, but then someone put out the question of whether we should be dictating what breeds can be service dogs. Thankfully, everyone agreed that it was a topic no one wanted to touch.

Then we moved on to the individual points under the scope.

the next big discussion came when we started talking about the training of a service dog.

This is when it got a bit heated.

To lower the temperature of the discussion, the chair suggested we just focus on the specifics and not on what types of training methods are acceptable or what equipment can be used.

As lunch approached, someone suggested that another working group should be formed to discuss training – GOOD IDEA!!!

After lunch, one of the industry people gave a speech on how they, and other ADI members, felt attacked. They very passionately voiced their opinion and strongly suggested people back off. I do agree that people seemed to attack ADI a bit too much in previous discussions, but I also felt as though a specific organization was getting attacked by not only individual members, but by other organization heads. It made me kind of sad because I don’t think any organization deserves the finger pointing, especially when the organization is being represented by one person, so to have almost 49 people (or feel like that many) pointing fingers at you, isn’t fair. I felt like saying something, but it wasn’t my place to do so.

The rest of the second day was taken up by a discussion of performance requirements and evaluation processes. It’s believed that the standard should outline what a service dog’s job is and provide an expectation of evaluation to ensure the team is working properly. I am personally not sure how you can decree what a service dog’s job is, but I do think it is a good plan to expect a certain level of evaluation.

I often wonder if maybe some of the supposed ‘fakes’ people talk about aren’t actually just service dogs who no longer do their job properly.

This is just a brief outline of some of the things we discussed and the debates we got into. If I find out where it is posted, I will post the link for the actual committee minutes.

I was assigned to the working group that is looking at terminology and definitions, yay!

Our next meeting is in February.

19 Days

Rogue and I have 19 days left to practice before we do our first CKC tracking test.

Over the past month we have been practicing at least a few times a week.

We have also been playing a “find the glove” game in the house to reinforce her “indications.” In order to pass the test, Rogue needs to clearly indicate that she has found the glove because the judge needs to know it was her and not me who found it.

We had a mock test on Thanksgiving Monday, but we completely bombed it!!

Rogue seemed excited to track, but Huib said that from the start she seemed unsure, and as the track went along she got more and more insecure. I also became frustrated, so near the end, I got her to come close and we walked together to the end.

After I’d calmed down, I was SO embarrassed, we assessed the situation. We realized that the track was over an hour old (to that point, she’d only been doing 40 minute old tracks) and it was extremely windy.

Despite being unsuccessful, the experience was also useful because it gave me an idea of what things we need to work on before the actual test.

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been doing 3 tracks, with each one being 10 minutes older than the last. She seems to be doing well and I think we’ll continue this up until the test.

In the meantime, I need to remind myself that even if we fail, we learned something and we can always do it again next year.

Show Dog: The Charmed Life and Trying Times of a Near-Perfect Purebred

Show Dog: The Charmed Life and Trying Times of a Near-Perfect Purebred by Josh Dean, is a great book for anyone who is interested in learning about the ins and outs of dog shows.

The author follows the campaign progress of a young Australian Shepherd named Jack as he works to earn his Grand Championship.

I really liked this book because it showed not only the messy politics behind conformation shows, like judges favouring professional handlers, but the author also presented the more personal side of things, the owner having to negotiate with Jack’s breeder, trying to cover the professional handling fees, etc.

In addition to following Jack across the US as he attended AKC shows, the author also followed him into the world of the Australian Shepherd Club of America.

I not only learned a lot about AKC shows, but I also learned a lot about the Aussie breed and about the breeding process.

this book honestly has it all, so if you’re curious about the world of dog shows and dog breeding, check this book out.