Wyoming Trip: Final Day

It’s hard to believe we go home tomorrow. It’s been an awesome trip and a really good experience for Rogue and I. We still have some work to do when we get home, but seeing how well she worked for me here has shown me that we will be okay in the end.

This morning we went to a local college campus to work on some orientation and stairs.

When we arrived at the college, Bill explained the route and I was supposed to meet up with Robin and Sherman in the first building. Rogue and I got out of the vehicle, I asked her to go forward and over left. She walked forward and moved slightly left, but I couldn’t find a curb, no matter how much I moved my left foot. Bill finally came over and explained that I was not quite at the curb, that Rogue had stopped 4 feet from a puddle that was in front of the curb I had directed her to. I turned around, walked back to the vehicle and then tried again – we did it.

Once we got into the building, Robin began talking to me about the importance of working Rogue through such issues, saying that if I had been somewhere alone that I did not know, I would have been screwed. I got a bit defensive and Robin got annoyed, so she turned around and walked back to the vehicle. I walked back towards the vehicle a few minutes later, but stopped at the curb and did some obedience with Rogue because I needed to figure out what to do to fix the situation with Robin. After about 5 minutes, bill came over and asked if I wanted a ride. I told him I wanted to apologize to Robin, but that I was also frustrated because i was telling the truth when I said that I would not go somewhere without knowing the exact route. Robin came over to us as we were chatting and I apologized and we set off again.

Sometimes stress just gets the best of me…thankfully robin is patient.

Once we got back to the building, Robin explained the first part of the route. She explained that she wanted me to work on teaching Rogue to go from barrier to barrier – door, wall, stairs, curb, etc. She told me that by going from barrier to barrier, i will find it easier to keep my bearings.

We walked to a door, then we turned left and walked down a hallway to a wall, then we turned around and walked back a few feet before turning to the stairway on the right. Rogue found the bottom of the stairs perfectly. We then walked down a zzig-zagging hallway to a door where we walked through a breezeway that included a few stairs down – Rogue stopped at the top and we proceeded down towards the door at the other end of the breezeway. We then walked down another hallway to an elevator where we went up. After we got out of the elevator, Robin said that we were looking for the third door on the right, so asked me to have Rogue take me to each door until we found the correct one. She said that by going to each door, I would be able to ensure that I found the correct door because I would have checked each one. I remember seeing a friend do this and wondered why he was wasting so much time, now I get it.

When we entered the third door, we were greeted by a woman who called over a guy who knew both Robin and bill. We chatted with the gentleman and were joined by two other women who began asking me questions about Rogue. It turns out the office was where robin’s son, Andrew, had his office, but he was off doing something, so we didn’t get a chance to say hello.

After we finished talking, we headed out of the office and did some more hallway work and walking from barrier to barrier, with a few stairways thrown into the mix. Rogue did really well, except that at one spot, there were two ramps and then two steps. Rogue walked me down the ramps and then forgot to stop at the top of the stairs, so I danced my way down them, trying to keep my balance. After my heart returned to it’s normal rate, we redid the section, starting at the top of the ramps, Rogue did it perfectly. Robin says that now that Rogue witnessed me almost falling down the steps, she won’t do it again – i really hope she’s right. Even though Rogue scared me to death by not stopping at the top of the stairs, I kept thinking about how dangerous it could have been for her if there had been more steps because I was wearing my over the shoulder leash, so if I had fallen, she would have had no choice but to go with me.

Once we finished working in the building, we walked towards the vehicle, but stopped at the curb where the puddle was, so that I could work with rogue on walking, rather than jumping over or refusing to walk near it. It took some luring, but we got her walking over and even standing in the puddle.

In the evening, we talked a lot about what I had learned and I finished off the tug I was working on. Robin said that I had taught her a valuable lesson about the importance of walking from barrier to barrier. She said that she had been trying to figure out what was going on for days and just came to the realization that I had never been taught this orientation skill. We also talked about some of the issues guide dog programs are currently having and the reasons for some of the problems.

I really hope I can remember everything Robin taught me and I hope to be able to come visit again in a year or two and show her how much improvement rogue and I have made. Robin really feels we are an awesome team and she believes that I could put Rogue beside any program trained dog and she’d shine brighter. I’m not totally sure she’s right, but I do know that I put a lot more work and heart into Rogue’s training compared to what gets put into program trained dogs, so I guess she’s got it there.

Tomorrow we catch our flight from Denver around 4:30pm (their time) and then arrive in Toronto at 9:41pm (our time). I am excited to see Huib again, but I am really looking forward to seeing Cessna and Canyon because it’s been a long 10 days without them.

I hope to post some pictures from our trip this weekend, I just need Huib to let me know if they are oriented correctly.

Comments

  1. It’s been great reading about your experiences. It sounds like you have an amazing mentor who knows what she’s talking about. 🙂
    I think the Canadian O and M system fails people in some ways because certain skills, like moving from barrier to barrier, seem to be missed. I didn’t learn that skill until I went to a UK guide dog school and I’ve always been totally blind. That was something I should have learned long ago because it really helps.
    hugs to you and Rogue and safe travels.

  2. It sounds like you have had a trip full of great learning experiences. I learned to travel barrier to barrier during O and M in elementary school, but will admit I didn’t always work that way until I had it drilled into my stubborn head again when I trained with my first guide. I’m glad Robin was able to help you sort out this issue.

Speak Your Mind

*